#Frostfire Blog Tour: Jamie Smith on Worldbuilding

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m really excited to share a guest post from author Jamie Smith on the theme of worldbuilding, as part of the blog tour for his book Frostfire. Onto the post!


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Tilly and the Bookwanderers Blog Tour: Author Interview with Anna James

Hello everybody! Today, I’m really excited to be taking part in the blog tour for Tilly and the Bookwanderers, which I read last month and loved, by interviewing its author Anna James. Onto the post!


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Theatrical Blog Tour: The Shows I’d Most Like to See and A Deep Dive into the DNA Of Theatrical

Hello everybody!

Today I’m taking part in the blog tour for Theatrical, which I really enjoyed last month, by talking about some of the plays/musicals I’d most like to see one day. I also have a list of recommendations of plays that author Maggie Harcourt loved whilst she was working on the book. Onto the post!

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The Polka Dot Shop Blog Tour: Giveaway

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m on the blog tour for the Polka Dot Shop, the new book from Laurel Remington, author of the Secret Cooking Club series. I’m going to be telling you a luttle bit about the book, and then how you could win a copy! Onto the post!


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Mirror Magic Blog Tour Guest Post from Claire Fayers: What Would the 17th Century Have Looked Like with Magic?

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m really excited to be hosting a guest post from Claire Fayers, about what the 17th century newspapers may have looked like had magic existed as part of her blog tour for Mirror Magic (which I really enjoyed earlier this month, and shall be reviewing come my June Reviews post!)

Over to Claire!


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Across the Divide Blog Tour: “We Have More in Common than What Divides Us”

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m really excited to be on the blog tour for Anne Booth’s new book Across the Divide, and to share a guest post from Anne, about how we can learn empathy from fiction. Over to Anne!

‘We have more in common’

I love twitter. When I felt lonely and isolated as a carer for elderly parents, twitter was a safe place where I could meet lovely people – writers, illustrators, librarians, teachers, booksellers, publishers, agents – who shared my enthusiasm and passion for children’s books and illustrations. Later, through someone I chatted to about children’s books on twitter, it led to me being published, and getting my wonderful agent. Things I read on twitter every day inspire and inform me and give me ideas for new books. I find it a great ongoing source of support and information and entertainment.

But it has its dark side. When I move away from the world of children’s writing and start reading political tweets, things get much more polarised and divisive and depressing. In the children’s book world, we tend to genuinely behave as if, as Jo Cox said, ‘we have more in common than what divides us’. Because politics is so much more adversarial, nobody seems to feel safe to acknowledge the good in their political opponents, or any badness in their own party. There are so many smears and so much selective reporting, so much finger pointing and generalisations and confusion and unspoken agendas. It is so hard to get to the truth, and yet it is presented as easy to find. If you state a political or religious opinion online you run the risk of being put in a box, and also being seen as someone who puts others in boxes. It doesn’t seem to be acceptable to ask questions about things you don’t understand or change your mind about things, in other words, get educated. There is little forgiveness or giving people the benefit of the doubt or understanding that there is good and bad in everyone. This is not healthy, and against the whole spirit of education and debate, and this approach is also poisoning the world outside twitter in which our children are growing up.

In researching the world of Britain at the time of WW1 I found the same poisonous polarisation. I found, for example, that genuinely brave Emily Pankhurst was, horribly, an enthusiastic giver out of white feathers to men she considered cowards for not going to war, and she and others did not recognise their bravery. I read of families divided, smears and lies and wilfully hateful interpretations of good people’s motives.

Stories can be an antidote to this poison. In the fictional world we have the time and the safe space to explore ambiguities and mixed motives, to let people make mistakes and change opinions. In the fictional world cowards can do brave things, enemies can become friends. We can become educated and learn to empathise – we can be uncertain without being screamed at. We can learn, through fiction, how history informs our present, and I hope that ACROSS THE DIVIDE takes the reader to a beautiful place to explore difficult ideas in safety.

ACROSS THE DIVIDE by Anne Booth is out now in paperback (£6.99, Catnip Publishing). Follow Anne Booth @Bridgeanne and Catnip @catnipbooks for more information

Have you read Across the Divide? Do you plan to add it to your TBR? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl!

Amy xxx

Blog Tour: Spotlight on Curse of the Nomed

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m going to be doing a spotlight post about BB Taylor’s Curse of the Nomed! Onto the post!

Blurb:

Ancient Gods, a cursed Librarian and a battle to save their souls. How hard could the first day of school really be? Welcome to Nomed Academy! An epic adventure for three unsuspecting year seven students as they embark on their first day of school. One they will never forget. But can they really defeat an ancient Egyptian God with nothing but revenge on his mind? All net profits from the sale of this book go to Partnership for Children, a mental health charity supporting the positive mental health of children.

About the Author:

Born in sunny Birmingham in the late 80’s I always wanted to write as a child, so as I grew and explored my love of working with animals and people I used all these experiences to create my first story and from there I was hooked! My Children and my animals are my main source of inspiration always giving me new ideas and stories to write. I studied as a Youth Worker and i’m also a qualified early years practitioner as well has having lots of random qualifications including in animals and sports 😉 My first book ever published is called Sox and Pals and is about my Raccoon Socrates, a very special raccoon that helps educate people all about animals and how to care for animals properly.

BB’s website: http://bbtaylor-books.co.uk/
BB’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorBBTaylor
BB’s Twitter: https://twitter.com/BB_Taylor_

Book Information:

Release Date: 17th May 2018
Genre: YA Fantasy
Publisher: Weird N Wonderful Tales

Formats the book is available in: Ebook & Paperback

You can find the book on Goodreads here

And you can buy the book on Amazon here

Thank you so much for reading! Do you enjoy books about mythology? Which are your favourites? Will you be adding this one to your TBR? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl!

Amy xxx