May Reviews 2018

Hello everybody!

Today, I`m going to be reviewing all of the books I read in May, apart from Northern Lights as it`s so well known and beloved by so many it just felt very odd trying to review it! Given I had only read 5 books by the 16th May, I`m incredibly pleased with how much I managed to read!


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What Lexie Did by Emma Shevah (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

This is about Lexie, a young Greek Cypriot, as a new girl and her family arrive in their close-knit community and this sets in motion a chain of events in which Lexie tells a lie about a family heirloom that threatens to break her family, and her friendship with cousin Eleni, apart forever. The friendship Eleni and Lexie had was so sweet, and I absolutely adored the heart-warming big family dynamic of the book. I thought Lexie was a fantastic character even though she has flaws, and I thought the situations she faces, such as how people treat her when she `tells tales` are incredibly relatable and will be to lots of people who read the book. The subtle humour throughout made me chuckle often, and while I was unsure how things would end for most of the book, I thought the climax and the ending fit the book perfectly. A truly lovely contemporary MG. 4.5/5

Sunflowers in February by Phyllida Shrimpton (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

This book has such a unique premise, which I`ve never read anything similar to that I can recall; it`s the story of Lily, who wakes up one morning on the side of the road and realises she has died, and we follow her as she watches her family grieve and then later as she is given the chance to take over her twin`s body and be alive again for a few days. Lily was such a likeable character, and I felt so upset for her as I was reading, and I also loved seeing glimpses of her relationship with her twin Ben (the scenes between them made me shed quite a few tears). Watching her family grieve was deeply emotional, and though it was initially slightly confusing I thought being able to have Lily`s first person POV and a third person POV focusing on how others were feeling worked really well. Finally, I loved Lily`s narrative voice; the writing was absolutely exquisite in quality, yet it gave such a sense of her personality and felt authentic. 4.5/5

Max and the Millions by Ross Montgomery

This is the story of Max, who is deaf and attends a boarding school, as he discovers an incredible miniature civilisation (created by his school caretaker) who are desperately in need of his help (which I think is such a cool concept!). The story is told in a dual narrative, with 3rd person POVs of Max and Luke, who is the prince of the Blue group within the civilisation, and I found seeing both perspectives really interesting. The budding friendship between Max and Sasha was absolutely adorable and drives home the message that you shouldn`t make assumptions about people before you really get to know them. The humour in Luke`s sections provided plenty of chuckle-worthy moments, and I was a big fan of side character Ivy in his sections and Sasha`s sister/ the builders in Max`s. Even more than all this, I loved the fact that Max wore hearing aids. While my hearing loss is less profound than his, a lot of his experiences resonated, and it was amazing to have that as part of the book. 4/5

The Fox Girl and the White Gazelle by Victoria Williamson (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

This book sees a Scottish bully called Caylin and a Syrian refugee called Reema who is newly arrived to Glasgow team up to save a fox and her cubs, discover a shared passion for running and forge a friendship that alters both of their lives, and it also explores their family lives/the grief they are navigating from the recent loss of family members. It is every bit as heartbreaking, yet ultimately heartwarming and uplifting as that description makes it sound. The characters are so complex and imperfect, yet I loved both of them a lot, and was beyond desperate for their lives to improve and for them to succeed with running. Their friendship was beautiful too; it took a while for them to move past their initial dislike of each other, but it was wonderful watching them support each other once they were friends. The book tackles alcoholism and depression, which Caylin`s mum has, and also explores how refugees may feel when arriving in a new country, which is an all too often ignored perspective, and both of these added to my love for the protagonists as I had so much sympathy for how much they had to face. I highly recommend this if you want to read a contemporary MG that make you consider what life would be like for people who have led very different lives to you. 4.5/5

Rose`s Dress of Dreams by Katherine Woodfine and illustrated by Kate Pankhurst (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

This is part of Barrington Stoke`s Little Gems series, which are short, young MG stories with full colour illustrations, and this was a lovely first one to read. It`s a delightful story, and I think it`ll appeal to a lot of people. Kate Pankhurst`s illustrations are gorgeous, and my personal favourites were the one at the opening of chapter 3, and that on page 43. The descriptions of Rose`s designs were divine, and I was able to picture them vividly even without an accompanying illustration. Lastly, I really liked Rose as a character because she was so determined to achieve her dream, and it was interesting to learn that she was based on real historical figure Rose Bertin. 4/5.


The Jamie Drake Equation by Christopher Edge

This is the story of Jamie, whose dad is an astronaut, as he receives alien communication on his phone whilst his dad is away on a dangerous mission. Jamie was an incredibly endearing protagonist, and I also had a soft spot for Buzz and his granddad. I like that the book acknowledges women can be astronauts and scientists too, and I also liked the message that families don`t have to be conventional to be happy that`s shown throughout. Like with the Many Worlds of Albie Bright, I felt the science elements complemented the contemporary storyline, and is better explained than science in the vast majority of books. 4/5

Gangster School by Kate Wiseman (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

I am all over books about boarding schools, and with a concept as interesting and different as a boarding school for future criminals, I knew I had to read it, and it twisted boarding school tropes fantastically in a way that made it feel different but also maintaining the quite cosy feeling you get reading a boarding school story. The book particularly focuses on Milly and Charlie, who have just begun their time at Blaggard`s and I really liked both of them as they rather stood out by being less ruthless than some of their schoolmates. I especially liked Milly, as she was incredibly quick thinking and clever. The plot of defeating villain Pecunia Badpenny was fast paced and exciting, and I`m looking forward to seeing what Milly and Charlie get up to next as the series continues. 4/5

Across the Divide by Anne Booth (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

In this timeslip middle grade, we follow Olivia as she is sent to stay with her estranged father on Lindisfarne after her mum gets arrested at a peace rally, and she is attempting to work through her thought on her mum and recent arguments among both her family and friend group focused on her wanting to join the new cadets group at school. I`ve never seen the theme of pacifism explored before that I can remember, and if I have, it certainly wasn`t as fascinating, well balanced and thought provoking as the way in which it is tackled here. I also liked that the timeslip plotline included discussion of conscientious objectors, which is in my opinion a heartbreaking historical event that isn`t remembered anywhere near enough. I liked Olivia lots as a protagonist; she manages to deal with all of the situations she faces in a very mature way, and I also really liked William, who is the boy she meets from the past. Finally, the setting brought me so much joy. Northumberland is pretty much my favourite place in the entire world, and seeing places I know and love referenced was lovely! 4.5/5

I Was Born for This by Alice Oseman (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

As I read this, my main thought was that Alice Oseman is incredible at writing character driven novels. I Was Born For This is about a fangirl called Angel, and a member of the boyband she loves (the Ark) called Jimmy, as their lives collide over one week and they question whether they actually want to dedicate their lives to the Ark anymore. The dual narration worked perfectly as both Angel and Jimmy`s voices were so clear and distinct, and it allows the positive and negative effects of fandom to be explored from both sides. The book was utterly gripping, and I`m super glad I could read it in one sitting as I was very concerned for each and every character, and needed to know they`d be okay. Finally, I have to talk about the characters, who are diverse and all round phenomenal. Jimmy and Angel are of course amazing, but my personal favourites were Rowan, Jimmy`s bandmate and longstanding best friend, as he was such a grumpy, hilarious delight and Bliss, who I think it`s a spoiler to describe the role of, other than to say she is a complete and utter queen and I love her more than I can express. 5/5

How to Bee by Bren MacDibble (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

I had heard amazing things about this, but overall it didn`t live up to my expectations. It`s about a dystopic future in which bees no longer exist, and specifically a girl called Peony, who desperately wants to become part of the group of children who now carry out the work of bees but is forced into moving to the City and then has to find her way home. While the idea sounded amazing, I found this hard to get into as it was so slow paced, and the writing style was also a factor in this. I found the slang that Peony uses jarring, and it took me a while to work out what everything meant. Additionally, I liked some of the ending, but found another part very confusing. However, I loved the friendship between Peony and Ez, as they brought out the very best in each other and had such a lovely relationship. 3.5/5


Alex Sparrow and the Furry Fury by Jennifer Killick (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

After their last mission, all has been quiet for Alex and Jess, but when animals in their local area start behaving in bizarre ways, they start volunteering at their local animal sanctuary to work out what`s going, and who`s behind it, coming up against several foes in the process. Alex is a tremendous character- he`s so cheeky and cocksure, and never far from a smart remark, but he has a heart of pure gold and this is shown so well by his relationship with one of the new animal characters Mr Prickles (who is absolutely adorable, and caused me to be in tears more than once during this book). Jess is also a fantastic character, and I envy her gift of speaking to animals so much. Her bickering, bantering friendship with Alex is just brilliant, and the dialogue in these books is definitely what makes them so hilarious. The animals all add to the humour too, and I was delighted to see the return of Bob the goldfish and to meet new introduction Harry the horse (and, as you already know, I was enchanted by Mr Prickles). Alongside how much the book made me laugh, Alex and Jess`s new mission ensures it`s super-fast paced, packed full of tension and full to the brim with excitement. 5/5

A Sky Painted Gold by Laura Wood (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

In her first novel in the YA age category, Laura Wood tells the story of a girl named Lou, as she becomes embroiled in the lives of the ultra glamorous Cardew siblings when they return to Cornwall for the summer of 1929 and is swept up in their world of lavish parties and societal politics. The beautiful descriptive writing conjured images of the lush setting and stunning outfits in my mind, and it was so immersive. Lou was a wonderful protagonist; headstrong, feisty, determined and funny, and I fell rather in love with her love interest Robert, who was arrogant yet deeply charming at the same time. Their relationship was super slowburn, and I was desperate for them to get together. His sister Caitlin was a total sweetheart and such a good friend to Lou, and Lou`s family were so eccentric and humorous. The company the Cardews keep is as interesting as you`d expect, and it was really fun seeing who showed up to which party and how that effected everyone else there. The secrets of the Cardews are revealed gradually, and the tantalising hints are what I think made the book so exciting. All I can really say about the ending is that it was perfect, and I can`t wait to read more from Laura. 4.5/5

Evie`s Ghost by Helen Peters

I`ve had this book on my TBR for so long, and I`m kicking myself for not reading it sooner; it came highly recommended and sounded like the sort of thing I tend to really enjoy. It tells the story of Evie, as she is sent to stay in the middle of nowhere with a godmother she`s never met, and finds herself transported back to the past, where she assumes the role of a maid in order to save someone in the mansion from a terrible fate so she can return to the present day. As the book is timeslip, Evie knows very little about life as a maid, and this means that the reader is able to learn a lot alongside her. Learning about the lives of servants in the past also allows Evie to really develop as a character to become kinder and more empathetic, and my heart ached for so many of the characters in the past (the servants, and also Sophia, who is the person in desperate need of Evie`s help). I was so glad the ending gave closure to all of their stories as well as Evie`s, along with the way everything tied together and made sense. 4.5/5

The Last Chance Hotel by Nicki Thornton (received from the publisher in exchange for my honest review)

From the moment I heard this existed, I was 99.9% sure I`d enjoy it; a middle grade mystery/fantasy blend combines several of my favourite things, and the book lived up to my high expectations of it. It`s about the Last Chance Hotel`s much put upon kitchen boy Seth, when a group of mysterious magicians arrive for a secretive dinner party, and he is accused of fatally poisoning the VIP, Dr Thallomius. Each and every other person within the hotel is a viable suspect, and this coupled with the fact we got to get to know each one in quite a lot of detail made it all the more fun to try and be a detective alongside Seth and try and work out whodunit. I`m not entirely sure if I was meant to, but I loved enigmatic Angelique, and I was rooting so much for Seth, who was so loveable I dare anyone to read this and not adore him, to clear his name. His rather critical, gloriously funny cat Nightshade was definitely my favourite though; she was a phenomenal animal companion. The magic system was really unique and clever too, and I hope to learn more about it in a sequel (or possibly several sequels, given the exciting loose ends the ending left). 4.5/5

Kat Wolfe Investigates by Lauren St John and illustrated by Beidi Guo

The Laura Marlin Mysteries are one of my very favourite mystery series, and I have a feeling Kat Wolfe Investigates is going to live up to that. It follows Kat as she and her mum, who is a vet, relocate to idyllic Bluebell Bay, and Kat gets caught up in a missing persons case after starting a pet-sitting service. She soon meets an American girl called Harper, and together they decide to investigate. I thought they made a great detective team as their strengths really complemented each other, and their friendship was fantastic too. I also adored the wide array of animal characters, who you can see beautiful illustrations of on the French flaps at the back of the book (and opening those at the front of the book will give you the treat of seeing the map). Though the mystery plot doesn`t really kick in for a little while, this worked well as we`re given a comprehensive introduction to both the setting and the cast of characters, and once it going I thought the mystery was unique fast paced, with chapters from the point of view of the antagonists adding even more intrigue/tension. 4.5/5


Which books have you particularly enjoyed this month? What are your thoughts on the books I`ve mentioned? Are any of them on your TBR? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl!

Amy xxx

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The Greatest Showman Book Tag

Hello everybody!

Today, despite the fact I am yet to see the Greatest Showman, I’m doing the book tag, which I was tagged for by Kelly. Onto the post!

The Greatest Show – The greatest book you have ever read:

Way too hard. But, in terms of a standalone, probably Boy in the Tower. It’s exceptional; it should be so bleak and hopeless, but it isn’t at all. Recent favourite standalones are Jess Butterworth’s and the Children of Castle Rock.

A Million Dreams – A book that left you dreaming after you finished it

I don’t think I’ve actually ever had a dream based on a book. I’m going to interpret this as a book that really immersed me into its world, and something that definetely fits that description is Sky Song by Abi Elphinstone.

Come Alive – A book where a character finally accept themselves:

I have (at time of writing) agonised over this for over a week, and been unable to schedule this post because of it. So either though I’m using her in another question too, I’m going with Harriet from Geek Girl. Over the course of the series, she learns that she IS a geek, but there is nothing wrong with that, and anyone who can’t appreciate her for her real self doesn’t deserve her.

The Other Side – A character who changes your opinion of them:

I really wasn’t keen on Hermes when I read Who Let the Gods Out, but he absolutely won my heart in Simply the Quest (and I think everyone who’s read that book will be able to guess the scene that caused me to change my mind!)

Never Enough – An author/series you could never get enough of:

The Murder Most Unladylike books. I want there to be like 20 of them, because they really haven’t dwindled in quality at all.

This Is Me – A book you love despite everyone hating it:

I really struggled with this, but one I like that others don’t seem to is Girl Online. I thought it was a really enjoyable book, and I liked the characters.

Rewrite The Stars – A bookish OTP that overcame a lot to finally be together:

Harriet and Nick from the Geek Girl series are my ultimate bookish OTP, and they managed to overcome the long distance aspect and many other misunderstandings to be together.

Tightrope – A book/series that gives you trust issues:

The ending of the Lost and the Found blows my mind to this very day, and I read it YEARS ago now. It was packed full of twists and turns, and I never quite knew which characters to trust.

From Now On – A book you’ve ignored for SO long, you need to read it ASAP:

The Secret of Supernatural Creek. I’m thinking I’ll take it on my holiday in the summer, though I’m not sure anymore whether I’ll reread the first four before it as I love them so much I’m worried it could taint my opinion (I will most definetely reread them again one day though, because I adore them)

Thank you so much for reading! Do you like any of these books? Would you recommend this film? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl!

Amy xxx

This or That Book Tag

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m going to be doing the This or That Book Tag, which I was tagged for by my fellow MG-lover Laura. While I could swear I’ve done a tag by this name before, I also don’t recognise the questions so I think they’re different! Onto the post!

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One: Reading on the couch or on the bed?

On the couch, because my bed has a really weird headboard that hurts my head due to my scar, and I often get dizzy lying down. I still read in bed, of course, but I find the couch much comfier and easier.

Two: Male main character or female main character?

I genuinely don’t mind at all. I see very little differences based on their gender, and I have books I consider favourites which have main characters of different genders.

Three: Sweet snacks or salty snacks when reading?

Sweet! Chocolate and ice cream are my absolute favourite snacks ever.

Four: Trilogies or quartets?

I’m actually struggling to think of a quartet I’ve read, so I’ll have to say trilogies I think.

Five: First person point of view or third person point of view?

I do love some third person narratives, but lots of my absolute favourite books have first person narrators, so I think it’s first person.

Six: Reading at night or in the morning?

I read more at night!

Seven: Libraries or bookstores?

I use, and really enjoy using, both.

Eight: Books that make you laugh or make you cry?

Books that make me laugh AND cry, if at all possible, but even though some of my most recent favourites were more serious/broke my heart, I think it has to be funny books if I’m only allowed one. The main reason I read (and watch TV/films and listen to music) is for escapism, and I think funny books do that in a really special way. Sad books have to have something really special for me to truly love them, and it’s much rarer they lift me completely out of my world(Running on the Roof of the World and Being Miss Nobody accomplished it perfectly)

Nine: Black book covers or white book covers?

Black covers! I own much more black covers, not to mention the fact they’re a lot easier to keep clean (which is handy given I often stain books…)

Ten: Character driven or plot driven stories?

I think an engaging character/cast of characters is incredibly important, and often my favourite thing about a story (and that can be in TV/movies too actually). Though a good plot is great too of course!

I tag Charlotte and Christina 💜


Thank you so much for reading! Do you agree with the choices I made, or would you have chosen the other option? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl!

Amy xxx

Top Ten Tuesday: Best Character Names

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m going to be talking about my favourite names, which is the theme for today’s Top Ten Tuesday. I couldn’t find characters with a couple of my favourite names, but I did succeed in finding most! Onto the post!

Boys’ Names (I found this one so much harder, mainly because I couldn’t find two of my favourite boys’ names in books, which are Caleb and Jude)

Micah– this is my absolute favourite boys’ name, and so I had to track it down even though I’ve never read a character with this name. I do want to read MG circus story Circus Mirandus, whose main character is called this, at some point. I think Micah is a beautiful name and it’s just my favourite name in the world, and has been for years. It’s unusual (I’ve certainly never met anyone called Micah) and I love names that aren’t that popular!

James– I’m not a big fan of Jamie, but I think James is quite elegant and classic, and it fits James Kirkwood in the Pony Club Rivals series perfectly (even though he’s sort of evil).

Aidan– Aidan was Issie’s first love interest in the PonyClub Secrets series, which I love, and he was such a great character I’ve always loved the name!

Sam– the main Sam I can think of in a book is Kristy’s brother in the Babysitters’ Club and I think it’s a really nice name.

Girls’ Names

Francesca– the only book character I can think of with this name is Francesca the Football Fairy (Rainbow Magic), and I think it’s so pretty. My absolute favourite girl’s name. I also love Cesca as a nickname for it.

Aoife– this is an Irish name, and I think it’s beautiful. I have (to the best of my knowledge) not read a book with a character of this name yet, but like Micah, I do have a book I want to read which does feature one (the Changeling by Helen Falconer)

Hazel– The narrator of the Murder Most Unladylike series is called Hazel, and my adoration of her makes this an immediate favourite. I also like it because it’s quite unusal, and I think it’s just pretty in general

Poppy– I loved the Princess Poppy books when I was young, and I love the name Poppy, though I can’t quite explain why. I think it just rolls off the tongue really well!

Juliet– I adore the name Juliet, I think it’s gorgeous; so dreamy and romantic. I’ve not read Romeo and Juliet yet, though I do hope to at some point this year, and I think the name sounds like it suits Juliet as a character quite well.

Lottie– this is short for Charlotte most of the time, including the Lottie in the Spinster Club, but though I really like Charlotte as a name too, I think it stands well as a name on its own.

What are your favourite names that appear in books? Do you like any of my choices? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl!

Amy xxx

The Pick n’ Mix Book Tag

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m going to be completing the Pixk n’ Mix Book Tag, which I saw on Kelly’s Ramblings, and decided to do as I really liked the questions. Onto the post!

Continue reading “The Pick n’ Mix Book Tag”

The I Love Spring Book Tag

Hello everybody!

Since we’re now in the last month of spring, and I do indeed rather like spring, I thought it would be fun to do the I Love Spring Book Tag, which I found on A Book Universe! Onto the post!

1) How is Spring where you live?

As wildly unpredictable as every season in Scotland. This year, it ran the gamut from heavy snow to sunshine. There’s been lots of rain too, of course. That’s a near constant feature of the part of Scotland I live in…

2) Most anticipated book release this Spring?

It was When the Mountains Roared by Jess Butterworth, a favourite author of mine I never shut up about, which I was actually lucky enough to read at the end of winter. But there have been loads of books I’ve been excited for/still am excited for during spring.

3) Show us a book cover that makes you think of Spring:

The colour of Battle of the Beetles is the exaxt colour I most associate with spring, so I’ll go for that. It’s an incredible conclusion to an incredible trilogy.

4) Where are you going to read this Spring?

I’ve mainly read in my house, I think. I also read sometimes on breaks/at lunch at school. We’ve just out our furniture back in our summerhouse, so I’ll be reading out there on nicer days/nights too now I imagine.

5) Find a cover with the sun on it!

I’m not 100% sure if it’s the sun or a moon, but I think the sun is on the cover of The Last Wild. It’s a dystopian MG adventure set in a world where all animals are becoming extinct, and I loved it (alongside the other books in the trilogy, even though I found it incredibly upsetting in places). The characters are so loveable and brave and wonderful, and they’re total page-turners.

6) What are your favorite Spring reads?

I don’t really change my reading preferences based on the season much, especially in Spring. I have certain books I’m saving for summer/autumn/winter, but didn’t have anything like that for Spring.

7) Find a book with many different colors on it?

I love how colourful the Exact Opposite of Okay’ s cover is! It’s super fun to spot all the different aspects that relate to the story on it too. Plus, the book is fabulous and you should definetely read it!

Thank you so much for reading! Has your weather been more akin to Spring than mine? What are your favourite things about Spring? Do any books have covers that remind you of Spring?

Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl,

Amy xxx

5 Books Which Feature Exams

Hello everybody!

As I write this, my exams are due to start in a few days’ time, and by the time this goes live I’ll have sat my first. Because of this, I thought it would be fun to make a list of books that feature exams taking place, or are referenced. Onto the post!

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Radio Silence– this has to be top of this list. I read it last May, on the day before/day of my last exam, and it’s amazing. It captures the pressure to do well, particularly when you’re seen as clever, so we’ll, and I related to it hugely. It’s also just a REALLY bloody good book. I was gripped, I was invested in the characters, I loved them so much turning the last page was bittersweet. Highly recommended. I have a bit of study leave with no exams after I sit all of mine, and I’m going on holiday, so I plan to read LOADS. I’ve decided to save Alice’s newest I Was Born For This as a treat (though looking at it every day is torture 😂😂), along with some others I think will be extra amazing.

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix– the OWLs, the wizarding equivalent to GCSEs or National 5s, take place in this book. Even though they’re fictional, they still show how stressful exams are and lots of other little details I thought were very true, like people trying to show off how much they revise which then panics others and all the teachers bringing it up all the time. This is my favourite Harry Potter book for lots and lots of reasons, and I can’t wait till I have time to reread them all again, hopefully before the end of the year.

Goodbye, Perfect– this is Sara Barnard’s latest book, and it takes place just before, during, and after the GCSE period. It touches on the pressure exams put on people, and they’re mentioned quite a lot throughout. The book is about Eden, the best friend of Bonnie who has run away with a teacher she is in love with, and explores how this affects her, which I thought was a super unique perspective. Eden is quite frankly amazing, as are her sister Valerie and boyfriend Connor, and it’s well worth a read if you’ve not yet picked it up! All of Sara Barnard’s books are, in fact.

Out of the Blue– this takes place in the summer, and is about a magical realism adventure in our world, but a version in which ‘Beings’ have started falling to earth, so it’s not the most obvious choice for this list. However, it does touch a little on the anxiousness before results day, AND it’s set in Scotland and mentions the actual exams I’m currently sitting (Highers), so also earns a place for that reason.

Magic in Manhattan– it’s been a while since I read this book (The 4th and final in the brilliant All About Rachel series), and I don’t think Rachel and Mike’s Samsorta ceremony to make them fully fledged witches is technically an exam, but they do have to take lotsof classes for it and prepare, so I thought it would be good to give it a shout out ! The books are about two sisters, Rachel and Miri, as they discover they’re witches and navigate how that affects their families, friendships and in Rachel’s case, romances. I so wish I knew where my copies were so I could reread!


What books can you think of that feature exams? Are you a fan of any I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl!

Amy xxx