Mystery and Mayhem pt 1

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m reviewing the first half of the wonderful Mystery and Mayhem anthology, written by a collection of UK authors and published by Egmont. I reviewed the second part of this collection on Book Murmuration  a few weeks ago and Louise reviewed this half here last week.

Onto the reviews!

God’s Eye by Frances Hardinge

While I found this quite different in tone, and much darker, than the other stories within the anthology, I still enjoyed it. It tells the story of Ben; who is assistant to one of two pernickety painters tasked with painting the ‘God’s Eye’ view of London, and what happens when one of them is fatally poisoned. I liked Ben as a character and his unselfish motive for solving for solving the mystery, as well as how the mystery itself unfolds.


The Mystery of the Pineapple Plot by Helen Moss

This is a sublime story set in the Georgian era, which shows that Helen Moss can write an expertly researched page turner regardless of length or the historical era it’s set in. It focues on a seemingly-rich family who are hosting a dinner to impress their elder daughter’s suitor, until he’s poisoned by their prize pineapple! Their servant Quality Fruit and younger daughter Catherine set about investigating. I absolutely adored them as a detective duo, and I thought the mystery was really intriguing. The historical setting was one I’d never seen before, but it felt realistic and the world was well built. The writing style is easy to read and hugely enjoyable; the last line especially made laugh. Finally, I loved the reveal of the culprit as I definetly didn’t expect the story to go in that direction.

The Murder of Monsieur Pierre by Harriet Whitehorn 

The last story in the Poison Plots section tells the tale of shop girl turned detective Angelica as she becomes embroiled in solving the murder of her former boss: hairdresser Monsieur Pierre. Angelica is a gloriously clever heroine, and I also liked that we got told she becomes a famous detective later in life. This is super fun to read as it’s such a melodramatic, madcap mystery (I guessed culprit, but I still had a lot of fun following along till the end). I’m not sure why, but it reminded me of watching Death in Paradise, excpet with child detectives! This has made me want to pick up the Violet books at some point in the future.

SafeKeeping by Sally Nicholls 

As a huge fan of most of Sally Nicholls’s books, I found it interesting to see her turn her hand to the mystery genre. This is a Boys’ Own style story which feautures three office boys trying to solve the mystery of a necklace which has disappeared from the office safe. The narrator is great and has a very distinctive voice. The dialogue and tone appeared realistic for the time, and I also enjoyed the friendship between the three boys. I found the solution of the msytery quite obvious, but I did like the way the detectives came to the comclusion.

The Mystery of the Purloined Pearls by Katherine Woodfine

In this offshoot from the Sinclair’s Mysteries, we see one member of the gang solve a mystery in a theatre. I love a good theatre mystery (especially the Mystery of the Pantomime Cat by Enid Blyton!) and this one was no exception. Woodfine’s prose is as flawless as ever, and I enjoyed seeing things from Lil’s perspective as we tend to follow Sophie during the main series. Finally, I didn’t guess who stole the pearls, and this has really whet my appetite for the 4th and final Sinclair’s book, which came out last week.

The Mystery of Room 12 by Robin Stevens 

In Stevens’s first foray into a contemporary setting, she proves that she’s just as excellent at creating a modern tone and setting as she is historical. She also manages to retain the Agatha Christie/Enid Blyton vibes that are so prominent in her Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries. This story is about Jamie, whose family own a hotel, as he tries to work out where the woman who checked in while he was manning reception alone, has disappeared to without a trace and why. Jamie was super endearing (I also adored his dog) and I thought he was a fabulous detective. Finally, I love how clever and complex the solution to this pacy, exciting mystery is, and I’d actually love to see more stories, or even books, in this setting.

Thank you so much for reading! What’s your favourite of these stories? Do you like any of these authors’ standalones? Are you a fan of mysteries in general?

See you soon with a new post, 

Amy xxx

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Pick a Word and Pass it On Tag

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m doing the Pick a Word and Pass it On Tag, which was created by Life Has A Funny Way of Sneaking Up on You and I was tagged for by the absolutely lovely Faye.

The idea of the tag is to list all of the books you’ve read with a certain word in the title. I’ve decided to continue on with the word Faye chose, which is home.

Let’s get onto the books!

I can only remember 4 books which I’ve read with home in the title, so insead of just listing them, I’m going to tell you a little bit about them too! 😊

A Home for Shimmer- This book tells the story of Amy as her family move to the countryside and open up a vet practise, and what happends when a golden retirever puppy is dropped off and Amy falls in love with her.  As you may know if you follow me on Twitter, my dog is also called Shimmer, and as I’ve mentioned before the book Shimmer is based on mine. There are lots of little nods to my real girl in the book and it was such a special reading experience. It’s also a fab animal story in general, and I’d recommend it to anyone who loves those sorts of books.

Back Home by Michelle Magorian- It’s been several years now since I read this book, and I’m struggling to remember the finer points, but I can recall being captivated and enthralled by Rusty’s story of returning from her evacuation to America and attending boarding school in England. I also remember how tinged with sadness it was. I’ve since went on to read the also incredible Goodnight Mr Tom by this author, and I found it heartwrenching also. Michelle Magorian is one of the most emotive authors I’ve ever read.

I‘ll Be Home for Christmas by various authors (Stripes anthology in aid of Shelter)- While this does, like every anthology, have some stories I’m not so keen on, it also contains some total gems. My personal favourite from what I remember was Cat Clarke’s, but I’m planning to reread/review this anthology on here in the next few months (possibly as part of blogmas, which I am SUPER excited for already!). I’m also looking forward to finally getting round to Stripes’ new A Change is Gonna Come anthology, which I think is such a positive movement and is getting incredible reviews!

Fly Me Home by Polly Ho-Yen- Polly Ho-Yen is one of the most talented writers out there at the moment. You may be bored of me saying it by now, but I don’t care 😎😛. It’s true, though, and Fly Me Home confirmed it for me. After being INCREDIBLY disappointed in her 2nd novel, which just didn’t match the quality of her debut at all, I was so thrilled when her 3rd novel Fly Me Home blew me away with it’s brilliance. I think with a few rereads this could mean very nearly as much to me as Boy in the Tower does (although it’s my favourite standalone MG ever, so maybe not exactly as much 😉)

Thank you so much for reading! I’m tagging Bex and Sarah, and you, if you’d like to do this! Can you think of any other books with home in the title? Let me know in the comments!

See you soon with a new post,

Amy xxx

TWO WAY AUTHOR INTERVIEW: Sita Brahmachari Interview 

​Hi everyone!

Today, I’m very pleased to welcome Sita Brahmachari for a two-way interview themed around her latest release Worry Angels , where we ask each other some questions. To try and make things as clear and non-comfusing as possible, I’ve put my questions in bold, Sita’s in italics, and both of our answers in plain text. Huge thanks to Kirstin at Barrington Stoke for asking me to host this 😊😊

Hi Sita. Welcome to Golden Books Girl!

1. What were the inspirations behind Worry Angels? Have you wanted to write something like this for a while, or is it a newer idea?

In the dedication I write that ‘Worry Angels’ is inspired by three wonderful people. One of them was a teacher at my children’s school. Her name was Margaret and she used to make papier Mache angels for the children. She is a truly creative and kind teacher who has touched the lives of generations of people and I wanted to write a story in homage to her. 

The second person who inspired me was a Sand Play Therapist called Maggie. Playing in the sand isn’t only good for children and young people. I experience Sand Play Therapy while doing some research on a play, and I found it to be the most wonderful way to free up the stories, worries and anxieties that all people, young and old must learn to cope with as part of life. That’s why I set the story at ‘ The Sandcastle Support Centre.’

The third inspiration is actually called Grace, like my character. She is a young artist who I met a few years ago when I worked on my novel ‘Kite Spirit,’ which also focuses on the pressures that young people face in our society. Real life Grace has made the beautiful animation for ‘ Worry Angels’ and although she is just setting out on her career I imagine her to be much like my character Grace might have been when she was young.

Two of these inspirations I met over sixteen years ago and Grace I met five years ago. Stories very often have long fuses, they can burn for a long time in the imagination of the author. ‘Worry Angels’ has always been alight in me, waiting for its moment to be told as there is a growing awareness of anxiety in younger children.  

1B – Have you had inspirational ‘ Angels’ in your life that you think will sustain you in the future? Can you see any qualities in my characters that your Angels share with mine!

I would have to say my mum, who’s got me through so many dark days, especially with my illness. I think our angels share the quality of kindness.

2. This book is for Barrington Stoke, who specialise in novels for reluctant readers and making reading easier. Did your writing process change at all as you were writing a novella, instead of a novel? What sort of things did you have to adapt?

Writing a novella is what I focus on when I set out to write a Barrington Stoke Book.  Obviously you are aware from the start that the story is shorter and therefore that you have less space and time to create your character’s world. This means that every brush stroke must count and that when a character is introduced you must ensure that they live in full 3D technicolour in the reader’s imagination without burdening them with lengthy description. It’s an excellent skill for a writer to hone. It makes you really dig deep and explore what is vital and what can be stripped away. So much of writing is about giving just enough to create the imaginative space for readers to inhabit. This is the challenge I love in writing Barrington Stoke Stories and short stories in general.   

I write these stories just as I would write any shorter stories. There is no difference in my approach.

2b) I believe that Barrington Stoke stories can be read by readers of all abilities. They’re just great stories.  Recently I met a young student who said ‘ I’m a really good reader so my parents say I should only read classics, and even though I would like to read those books my parents would think that they are too easy for me’ . What would you say to persuade her that reading a BS book would be a good idea?

First of all, I absolutely agree with your sentiments. A book is a book is a book, if you ask me, and what age range/reading ability it’s intended for has no bearing whatsoever on it’s quality, and I like to think I’ll be reading MG and YA till I’m old and grey. If you aren’t reading Barrington Stoke books, you’re missing out on some absolutely incredible characters and stories.

3. Are the characters based on you/people you know? How did you come up with them all? I loved Amy May and Grace especially.

I have spoken about the two Margaret’s who inspired me to write Grace but in many ways I have also been inspired by teachers from my own school years. When I wrote my first novel ‘ Artichoke Hearts’ I was at a school event and an elderly lady came up to me to ask if I would sign. She was a teacher who had known me when I was ten years old she asked if I remembered her…. I did and in many ways she has stayed  with me  over the years – one of my Grace angels, encouraging me, giving me confidence. Just as Amy May’s father never forgets Grace…. I haven’t forgotten the teachers who helped me find the confidence  to be a writer either.

Amy May grew straight out of my imagination and an awareness of how many children need to make the adjustments to changes in their families that they don’t have any power over. In Amy May I wanted to create a character who has experienced a relatable story that many children do experience, or know people who have experienced. Rima’s family experience of having to leave her country and wider family in Syria is so extreme and different to Amy May’s but their friendship also allows the two girls to explore how what they have in common is a search for security.   

A beautiful Jane Ray illustration from Worry Angels

3b. What did you love about Amy May and Grace? What do you think the characters learn from each other in the story? 

They just seemed very real, and I empathised hugely with Amy-May and Rima. I loved watching them learn about one another and become friends. Grace is someone I’d love to know. She was so reassuring and calming.

4. A big part of Worry Angels are the crafts Amy May and Rima do with Grace. Do you enjoy arts and crafts? What have some of your favourite projects been, if yes?

I am a very crafty author!  I create words and stories and then I make things… or work with people who make things. My collaboration with the artist Grace who made the animation for ‘Worry Angels’ and also ‘Red Leaves’ as well as a walk in installation for ‘ Kite Spirit’ is all about exploring the stories through visual projects. I even have a patchwork storytelling quilt that I take around schools with me to explore the place in all of us where creative writing comes from. Like Grace I am a collector of small objects that I place in my quilt and use to help me talk about my stories.
I love graphic novels and illustrated novels and I am so honoured that the wonderful Jane Ray’s drawings grace the pages of ‘Worry Angels.’ We work together at Islinton Centre for Refugees and Migrants… and I think Jane has created the art room that she dreams of working in too. If I could step into her art room right now I would.

4b. How about you Amy? Do you like crafts and art? If so what do you get out of them? Would you like to visit Grace’s art room? If so what, of the activities Grace offers would be your preferred activity? Baking/ sandplay/ papier mache/ gardening/ art?

I’m afraid I’m the least artistic person in the world! (Seriously, even my stick men are deformed). I do enjoy it though when I’m not under any pressure to produce something good, so I’d love to do some art and crafts and baking with Grace. I’d love to plant pretty flowers in the garden too.

5. Amy`s mum seems to struggle with the idea of Grace`s school, which teaches mainly through art and holistic methods. What are your thoughts on schools like this?

Sometimes one dreams up the worlds that we would like to exist. The truth is that there are more and more children suffering from school anxiety and anxiety in general.  I think it’s an area that needs proper attention and funding as if young people’s anxieties are not cared for they can become much more serious as they grow into teenagers and young adults. I wish that there could be a Grace and an Iman and a sandcastle support centre attached to every school in the country….and even though that is unlikely to happen in the current funding climate perhaps something of the quality of Grace’s centre might filter through into schools. 

The magic of writing is that you can wave your pen-wand and make something true in a story…. I’ll keep waving! 

5b) What do you think of these kind of holistic schools? In my story The Sandcastle Support Centre is for children with anxiety? What aspect of the centre do you think would be good to integrate into schools in general? How would this benefit young people? 

I think these schools are fabulous, and I’d love to see them imtroduced into every school, so that children struggling for some reason could 

Cheeky bonus question- Would you ever revisit these characters? I really want to know what`ll happen next!

Well strangely enough. I have been invited by Scoop Magazine to write a little off shoot story of ‘Worry Angels’ and I chose to write a story about Grace’s retirement day when everyone at the centre sets out on a day trip to….

I haven’t thought about a ‘Worry Angels’ story beyond that… but you never know… one of the characters may tap me on the shoulder at some point in the future and ask me to write their story forward from ‘Worry Angels!’

6b At what age would you like to see these characters again? 

I’m not sure what age, but I’d love to see Amy-May and Rima help another child the way Grace and Iman help them in Worry Angels.

You find Sita on Twitter @sitabrahmachari and on her website here.

Thank you so much for reading? What did you think of Worry Angels? Are you a fan of Barrington Stoke? What activity would you choose in Grace’s art room?

See you soon with a new post 

Amy xxx

Guest Review: Mystery and Mayhem pt. 2

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m excited to welcome my wonderful friend Louise to do a review of the second half of the marvellous Mystery and Mayhem anthology. I reviewed part one on Louise’s blog a couple of days ago, and I’m planning to to review this half in the next week or so too 😊

Over to Louise! 
God’s Eye by Frances Hardinge

Newspaper owner Whyte wants a ‘Gods Eye’ view of London. Rival artists Solomon Cork and William Pother are commissioned, although they hate each other so much they refuse to fly in the air balloon together. With Cork flies his young employee Billy. Then Cork falls out of the balloon, and Billy’s friend Susan is arrested on suspicion of poisoning. 

I love the trail of clues in this mystery. It was intriguing enough to keep me reading, and had the perfect balance of believable and out-of-the-ordinary. The set-up gives us just enough people to suspect, and gives Billy reason to care for Susan. Set in the 1800s, it comes across how exciting early flight was. People dream of new possibilities as the skies become accessible to humans for the first time. 

The Mystery of the Pineapple Plot by Helen Moss

It is the 1700s. Ten years ago, a child arrived in England in a crate of pineapples. He came from the plantations, but was kept as a playmate for Lord Catchpole’s daughters. He was named for the words on the side of the crate, Quality First. 

Now Lord Catchpole’s eldest daughter Eliza is engaged against her will to Lord Ponsonby. The pineapple cuttings taken when Quality First was a small child now bare fruit, and Lord Catchpole is engaged in fierce rivalry with his neighbours for the best pineapples. When a pineapple explodes, and a worm bites Lord Ponsonby on the nose, the race is on to find out who put the worm in the pineapple before servant Sam is punished.

Beautifully written. I love Moss’s prose. Her descriptions are so subtle, and often conveyed with action rather than statement. The setting is brought to life through the focus of Lord Catchpole’s obsession with the exotic. As import became wider, new goods arrived in the UK and people became obsessed with the ‘foreign’. Moss shows how what people wanted often wasn’t the real thing, but a very British idea of what another country was. 

This was one of the few stories which wasn’t a murder mystery, and shows how widely the term can be applied. 

The Murder Of Monsieur Pierre by Harriet Whitehorn 

When Monsieur Pierre is murdered, Angelica ‘Jelly’ Beck vows to find out who did it. Was it Lady Osborne, who visited the same evening, or rival shopkeeper Monsieur Leonard?

I found this a little slow-going, but liked Angelica. We are told at the start of the story that she goes on to become a master detective, and the idea that she learned her skills in childhood must be exciting for young readers. 

Safe-Keeping by Sally Nicholls

A necklace is stolen from solicitor Mr Mathieson’s safe, and Mr Contrad is arrested. Young empolyees Billy, Arnold and Stanley set out to find the truth, inspired by the heroes of their favourite ‘tec’ stories. 

The trio of young protaganists reminded me of Katherine Woodfine’s group of young detectives. I LOVE the Sinclair mysteries, so this is positive. I liked how this story was less about the actions which happened, and more about who had the biggest motive

The Mystery Of The Purloined Pearls by Katherine Woodfine

Kitty Shaw’s pearls are stolen from her dressing room. She won’t go on stage without them, to the horror of the theatre producers. Why would anybody steal Kitty’s pearls? 

Did I mention, I love the Sinclair Mysteries? This story is set in the same world. Instead of being told by Sophie, as in the novels, it is narrated by Lil. It was lovely to be back in a familiar world, and to hear Lil’s voice in first person. The set-up is great – a group of people are introduced, and it became apparent that someone’s actions and reactions were a little out-of-sync. A little suspicious

The Mystery of Room 12 by Robin Stevens

James Kahn is left on reception one evening in his father’s hotel. He knows he checked Stella Smith in. Knows she wrote her name and went upstairs. In the morning, her name is gone, her room spotless and nobody believes James. 

Could Stella Smith be runaway Andrea Sandford? If so, what happened? Did she simply disappear? And why are the other guests so keen for him to forget he saw her? 

Unlike most of the stories in the book, it isn’t clear whether there has been a murder or any sort of incident until near the end. I love this format. Robin Stevens is masterful as what she reveals when, and I was hooked. It also had my favourite overall line, about adults: ‘they’ve been around too long, and that means they can’t see what has really happened because they’ve seen too much other stuff already’. Brilliant observation.

Thank you so much to Louise for these fabulous reviews! What did you think of this anthology, if you’ve read it? 

Amy xxx 

#sixforsunday : My Favourite Genres

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m once again taking part in Steph’s Six For Sunday meme. Today, the theme is our favourite genres. Let’s get started on mine, along with some of my favourite books/authors within them!

In no particular order…

Romance- I always enjoy a swoony romance. There’s just something about watching two characters falling in love that hooks me in to a book. Some recent favourites include A Quiet Kind of ThunderAnna and the French Kiss and the Start of Me and You. 

Contemporary- I also love contemporary novels without romance, such as Beautiful Broken Things and Wing Jones (I know this does have some fabulous romance, but it also has quite a separate storyline so I regard it more as contemporary than romance). Even though I barely ever see it, I also love contemporary MGs. Being Miss Nobody, which fits that description, has been one of my top three reads this year, and another great example of contemporary MG is Susie Day.

Mystery- Even though I said this was in no particular order, mystery may well be my favourite genre of all. It got me back into reading at a time when I fell out of love with it (I’m forever indebted to Laura Marlin and Adventure Island, which I still reread often) and I think the quality of MG mystery being released at the minute, for example Robin Stevens’s Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries, is absolutely sublime. 

Adventure- Recently, I’ve started to read some more middle grade adventure stories. I fell head over heels for the lyrical contemporary adventure Running on the Roof of the World, as you’ll probably already know if you’ve read some of my posts before, and I also loved the more action packed Defender of the Realm. 

Fantasy- WhileI don’t enjoy some more epic fantasies, I do love some more understated ones. Prisoner of Ice and Snow is a wonderful MG fantasy and I can’t wait for the next in the series! Polly Ho-Yen’s stunning books also have some fantasy elements, along with contemporary and magical realism.

Historical- It’s absolutely fascinating to read about other times and places, and these books are often based on real facts and sometimes even events. Emma Carroll really is ‘The Queen of Historical Fiction’ and Karen McCombie’s recent historical/timeslip offerings are also excellent.

Thank you so much for reading! I’d love to hear about your favourite genres in the comments down below or on my Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl

See you soon with a new post,

Amy xxx

#sixforsunday : Some of My Favourite Fictional Worlds

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m taking part in the #sixforsunday meme, which is hosted by Steph. I took part in lots of these in my first weeks of blogging but haven’t really since I started scheduling my posts in advance, until Steph announced all of the topics last week! So today, I’m going to be writing about some of my favourite fictional worlds 😊

Let’s get on with the post!

1. Demidova in Prisoner of Ice and Snow by Ruth Lauren- This is an icy, snowy, Russian-inspired setting that felt phenomenally developed. I cannot WAIT to discover even more of it in the sequel next year! 

2. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter- I feel like this is going to be on every list this week, as it should be. I was very late to Harry Potter (aged 14) and I still wished with every chapter that I could just jump in and live in this world. Going back for rereads (which I’ve done about 5 or 6 times in a year and a half), it really is like going home.

3. Zavania from the Worlds of Wishes series by Carol Barton– This series is so, so amazing and it makes me sad how few people have heard of it! Zavania is a beautiful kingdom and the adventures the characters go on show this wonderfully, and are also just perfect middle grade fantasy adventures. I really must reread these again soon!

4. Alternate London from the Lockwood and Co series by Jonathan Stroud- This series is one of my favourites in general, and the remaining of London is so spooky and imaginative. I wouldn’t want to live there, but by goodness it’s good fun to read about it!

And now for a few non fantasy worlds to finish off…

5. Castle Key from the Adventure Island series by Helen Moss- I can’t tell you how much I’d love to live on Castle Key. It’s filled with brilliant characters and gorgeous beaches and yummy places to eat, and plenty of mysteries to solve. It’s right up my street (how I wish I meant this literally! 😭).

6. Stoneybrook from the Babysitters Club series by Ann M Martin- Even though the BSC books are filled with plot holes/dodgy timelines, I love them. They’re basically my ultimate comfort books, and I’ve devoured them so many times I really do feel like I’m a resident of Stoneybrook and I’m right there with the characters. 
Thank you so much for reading! I’d love to hear your favourite fictional settings in the comments below or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl 

See you soon with a new post 

Amy xxx

The New Disney Princess Tag

Hello everyone!

Today I’m once again combining my loves of books and Disney in order to do the new Disney Princess Book Tag, for which I was tagged by the LOVELY Rosie from Rosie Freckle Reads (albeit a tad unofficially in the comments, when I mentioned my love for Disney 😂)

Let’s get onto the tag!

Rules!

  1. Mention who tagged you or where you saw it
  2. Tag the creators – The New Disney Princess Tag was created by Mandy and Zuky
  3. Play a game of tag at the end!

Snow White
The Book (Like the Movie) That Started it All
Favourite Debut Book from an Author 

I’m making this my favourite debuts from 2017 for fairness, and some of those have been Prisoner of Ice and Snow by Ruth Lauren, Running on the Roof of the World by Jess Butterworth, Being Miss Nobody by Tamsin Winter and Noah Can’t Even by Simon James Green.

Cinderella
A Diamond in the Rough
Just Like Cinderella, You Didn’t Expect Much Out of This Character in the Beginning But Turned Out to be a Total Gem

As I was recently discussing this with someone, I’m going to say Jennifer Jones from Looking for JJ by Anne Cassidy, who I expected to loathe but actually felt incredibly sorry for as I was reading.

Aurora
Sleeping Beauty
A Book That Makes You Sleepy Or Could Not Hold Your Attention 

Some recent disappointing reads in this sense have been Sea by Sarah Driver and Freshers by Tom Ellen and Lucy Ivison.

Ariel
Under the Sea
A Book With a Water/Ocean setting 

I can’t think of many books with a water/ocean setting, but two I love are Mermaid Magic by Gwyneth Rees and Mermaid Wishes by Carol Barton. I read both of these when I was young and I was captivated. I highly recommend them both to anyone looking for funny, sweet lower middle grade (Mermaid Wishes is absolutely hilarious in places, and I STILL enjoy rereads of that series just as much now.)

Belle
Beauty and the Books
Name a Book With the Best Bookworm/Book Lover 

I think I have to go for Harriet Manners here, don’t I?! What kind of obsessed Geek Girl fan would I be otherwise? 😂

Jasmine
The Thief and the Princess

Name a Book With an Unlikely Love Story (Either in Terms of Romance or a Book You Didn’t Expect to Love So Much)

A book I didn’t expect to love as much as I did is Fly Me Home by Polly Ho-Yen. If you’ve heard me speak about her debut Boy in the tower (which, for the record, I think is a masterpiece of middle grade and deserves every award imaginable and should be read everywhere) you’ll possibly be a bit shocked by this answer. However, I wasn’t at all a fan if her 2nd novel so I was hugely apprehensive going into this, and I honestly couldn’t have been more thrilled that it was very nearly on a par with Boy in the Tower and will possibly end up being as special to me as that book is after a couple of rereads.

Pocahontas
The Real Life Princess
Name a Book That is Based on a Real Life Person You Want to Read/Have Read

One of my favourite series ever, the 39 Clues, contains real historical figures and although it fictionalises some things there is a lot of real information in there too which I found fascinating and has introduced me to some amazing periods of history and people from history. 

Mulan
The Princess That Saves Her Country

Name the Fiercest Heroine You Know

Daisy from the Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries! She has many faults, but she’s feisty, fierce and a totally fabulous detective. Another awesome female detective I love is Emily Wild from Adventure Island by Helen Moss, and a YA heroine ho would fit this too is Lottie from Holly Bourne’s superb Spinster Club trilogy!

Tiana
The Princess with the Coolest and Most Diverse Crew

Name a Diverse Book Whether it is a Diverse Set of Characters or Just Diverse in General 

I’m going to go for Radio Silence by Alice Oseman for this question. It’s a wonderful book that I was totally gripped by (it was an utter pain having to stop for a few hours so I could do last minute revision for and sit my Modern Studies exam, let me tell you)

Rapunzel
Let Your Long Hair Down
Name the Longest Book You’ve Read


I’m pretty sure the longest book I’ve ever read is Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix! My copy is 800 pages long, but I read it in a day the first I read them as it’s so phenomenally written and paced.

Merida
I Determine my Own Fate
A Book Where There is No Love Story/Interest or Isn’t Needed

I think I have to shout out to Beautiful Broken Thungs by Sara Barnard here. It’s an absolutely anazing book that tackles how messy female friendships can be and shows a character recovering from childhood abuse in her new home. 

Anna and Elsa
Frozen Hearts
A Book in a Winter/Cold Setting 
I’m going to cheat a bit and say Prisoner of Ice and Snow again. It’s world building of snowy, icy Demidova is too incredible not to.

Moana
How Far I’ll Go
A Character That Goes on a Journey 

Alfie from Defender of the Realm (and Dark Age) by Nick Ostler and Mark Huckerby goes on some epic actual and emotional journeys in these books. I’m both excited and terrified to see what the 3rd book will hold for him next year!

Thank you so much for reading! I hope you’ve enjoyed the post. I’m taggimg Hannah and Rebecca, as I’m pretty certain they’re both Disney fans too!

See you soon with a new post 

Amy xxx