Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’ve Picked Up Because of Blogger Recommendations

Hello everybody!

Today, I’m taking part in Top Ten Tuesday, hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl, and today’s prompt was to pick a past topic. I’ve decided to go for books I’ve picked up because other bloggers have recommended to me; some of which I’ve read and others that are still on my TBR (and I haven’t got a full ten, which I just want to point out in case anyone thought I couldn’t count 😜). Onto the post!


Continue reading “Top Ten Tuesday: Books I’ve Picked Up Because of Blogger Recommendations”

Advertisements

Guest Post: Festive Books with the Boy by Charlotte, Somewhere 

Hello, and welcome to day 13 of blogmas! Today, I have my hilarious friend Charlotte and her equally hilarious son S here to share some of their favourite Christmas books. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did!

Today the Boy and I are sharing five of our favourite Christmassy books with you. They aren’t in any particular order and a couple S was adamant I include even though they are very definitely HIS favourites and not mine, but who am I to argue with a kid at Christmas? So, in no particular order:

All I Want For Christmas Is My Two Front Teeth

S: I like this one because the monkey in it loses his two milk teeth and then he grows big boy teeth just in time for Christmas so he can eat his Christmas dinner with his new teeth. And I’ve been growing some big two front teeth so that’s good. Look mummy <small child shoves his teeth right in my face>

Me: I agree, it is very important to have your two front teeth. This one was a gift my parents sent S from New Zealand a few years ago, and I like it because it’s different to the other Christmas books we have. It’s fun and reminds me of the Christmas song which always makes me laugh. 

You Can Do It Sam

S: This one is my favourite because Sam bakes cakes ALL BY HIMSELF and then he takes them to all of his friends on Plum Street for presents. I like to make cakes (As his mother, I need to point out that what he actually likes doing is cracking eggs and then wandering off leaving someone else to bake the cake).

Me: I need some friends who bring me cake as presents. Anyone know where I can get them? This is part of a small series of books that starts with Kiss Goodnight Sam, which was one of my favourite stories to read to S when he was little. You Can Do It Sam isn’t so much a Christmas story as it is a lovely winter story about friendship and the spirit of giving (not necessarily of spending a fortune).

Father Christmas Needs a Wee

S: This is my favourite most funny Christmas book. It makes me laugh and I like it the most because daddy does not like reading it to me. He does not. He says “no way” and I say “yes way” and then he has to read it and it makes him be grumpy. 

Me: My auntie bought this for S when we were competing to find the most inappropriate kid’s picture books to send each other’s kids. Yes, I am a fully fledged adult, why do you ask? This book has much of the toilet humour that small children adore (Santa drinks all the drinks and has to race home before he wets himself), there is also counting and rhyming and excellent illustrations. There’s a partner book called Father Christmas Comes Up Trumps, but it’s probably best if I don’t explain that one. 

Mog’s Christmas Calamity

S: I like the bit where everything gets set on fire. That’s it. I love fire.

Me: That’s my boy! *cough* I mean, isn’t there anything else you like about it?

S: Everyone brings Christmas dinner. 

Me: So, fire and dinner. What’s not to love? Mog’s Christmas Calamity is based on a Christmas advert from a couple of years ago. I loved the ad and I love the book. Accident prone Mog accidentally causes a fire and calls the fire brigade. Then everyone comes together to make Christmas special for the family. I love this. I remember once when I was little and the electricity went off on Christmas day. We were one of the few houses on our street with a gas oven, so we had at least two other turkeys in our oven. This Mog book always reminds me of that. It’s nice when people come together at Christmas. It’s nicer if it involves a fire *cough* and dinner, of course. 

The Snowman and the Snowdog

S: Why do I even like this one? I liked the snowdog. Remember we did that big snowdog hunt and found aaaallllll the snowdogs? And we’ve got a dog. I like when the boy makes a snowdog and then it comes to life after his old dog gets dead. Can I have a snowdog? 

Me: Boy do I remember hunting down snowdogs in the winter. there were 50-odd of the giant ceramic ******** to find, and we got to see all but one. I always liked the snowman when I was little, and it was one of the first books we got when S was born. The Snowman and the Snowdog has much of the same magic. I love the inclusion of the little dog with socks for ears and that this one has a happier ending, because even though I am now in my thirties, I am still not over the ending of The Snowman. Also, no. No you cannot have a snowdog son. Dexter would eat it. Or pee on it. 

So, there you have it. Some of mine and S’s favourite Christmas books. Do you have a favourite Christmas book to tell us about? We would love to hear from you! 

Thank you for reading! Make sure to let us know YOUR favourite Christmas books, and see you tomorrow for day 14!

Amy xxx

Guest Post: 10 Things About Christmas in Being Miss Nobody by Tamsin Winter 

Hello everybody!

Today, I have a guest post from the amazing Tamsin Winter (author of Being Miss Nobody, which I thought was incredible).

Over to Tamsin!

1. It’s in the school Christmas assembly when the idea for writing a blog starts to flicker in Rosalind’s mind. She’s been silent at her new school for a whole term, and she’s beginning to figure out a way to have a voice.

2. Christmas Day takes on a whole new significance when Rosalind accidentally finds out it could be her little brother’s last Christmas. 

3. Their dad is extra embarrassing during the Christmas period. He wears reindeer antlers to the supermarket, for example. Like Rosalind says, “There must be something in my dad’s DNA that prevents him from feeling any kind of social embarrassment. I feel the Exact Opposite to that pretty much all the time.” 

4. Rosalind has a Major Emotional Meltdown On A Colossal Scale when she finds out her auntie is coming for Christmas Day. Rosalind can’t speak in front of her, so it means she’ll have to spend the whole day in complete silence. 

5. Her parents invited Rosalind’s auntie because it’s her first Christmas since getting divorced, and they didn’t want her to spend the day alone. Like a lot of people who have family members with mental health conditions, or other types of conditions, Rosalind’s parents find it difficult to balance Rosalind’s needs with the needs of the rest of the family. They don’t always get it right.

6. Rosalind’s angry, emotional outpouring of words on Christmas Day was a difficult scene to write, and one that illustrator Emma Trithart captures beautifully in a ‘word tsunami’. Luckily, Rosalind’s little brother Seb is there to brighten the mood with one of his Brilliant Ideas.

Emma Trihart

7. Rosalind spends a lot of time with her ex-Christian Missionary and slightly crazy cat lady next-door neighbour, Mrs Quinney, who tells her bible stories (and gets annoyed if the cats aren’t listening). Although her family aren’t religious, Rosalind prays a lot in the book. And becomes a little obsessed with looking for signs from God. She craves support and guidance and, because of her SM, isn’t always able to ask for help. The one thing she wants more than anything is a friend.

8. Christmas Day is the first time Rosalind tells her parents about the bullying she’s been experiencing. I wanted to write a book that explored the instinct that many young people have to hide bullying from parents and teachers – the very people who would be able to help. This is an important scene in the book because it’s when Rosalind takes the first very brave step towards opening up.

9. On Boxing Day morning, Rosalind discovers an unopened gift. It’s a diary given to her by speech therapist Octavia, who as Rosalind says, “is not exactly an angel, but not exactly a normal person either.” In it, Octavia has written a quote from Maya Angelou – ‘If you are always trying to be normal, you will never know how amazing you can be.’ 

10. This quote has an enormous impact on Rosalind. And a thought comes into her head that changes everything: ‘What if I could be more than just a nobody?’ 

Thank you for reading! What did you think of Being Miss Nobody, if you’ve read it? Is it on your TBR? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl!

Amy xxx

PS- head over to Twitter, where I’m running a giveaway of this boo today for a chance to win it! UK only.

5 Books with Great Food in Them

Hello everybody, and welcome to day 8 of blogmas!

Today, as food is quite a big part of Christmas for lots of people, I thought it would be fun to talk about books which feature lots of it.

Onto the post! 

Love, Lies and Lemon Pies by Katy Cannon– this is one of my favourite YA books of all time. It’s about Lottie, still struggling to cope with the loss of her dad, and Mac, who feels trpped by his nightmare home life, and them finding each through the new school Bake Club. The recipes (which the characters cook, and we are given!) are varied and so much fun to read about (even though I probably wouldn’t eat any of them 🙈)


The Secret Cooking Club/Confetti and Cake by Laurel Remington
– these are lovely middle grade stories about Scarlett, who has abandoned all her hobnies due to her oversharing mum blogger mum, finding an escape in cooking. This leads to new friendships, a whole lot of fun and her life taking a turn for the better. And it features lots of yummy sweet treats, hence why it’s on this list!


Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries by Robin Stevens
– this  book (and all it’s equally excellent sequels) introduced readers to the concept of bunbreak, and rarely a day or two goes by where I do not see that word in my social media circle somewhere. I also indulge in one myself from time to time… . I absolutely love all delicious ones we see superstar sleuths Daisy and Hazel indulging in throughout.


Boy in the Tower by Polly Ho-Yen
– this is an admittedly weird addition to this list given the main food choice (which I shall not tell you) but the scenes where all the characters come together to eat are probably my favourites as they really drive home the message of a struggling community leaning on each other.


Harry Potter by J.K Rowling
– the Hogwarts feasts are quite literally magical, and I would seriousky love to attend one if I could (*sobs loudly*). Also, the company would be amazing. I’d get to laugh with the Weasley twins, eavesdrop on the Golden Trio’s crazy plans for whatever they’re doing next and comfort lovely Neville in his lower moments. 
Thank you for reading! What books with great food can you think of? Do we share any answers? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl!

Amy xxx

The Animals and Books Tag

Hello everybody!


Today I’m going to be doing the Animals and Books tag, which I saw on Jo’s blog and thought really fun. I was planning to do my November reviews, but as I feel my reading’s been slow this month and I’m planning to do mainly rereading in December,  I’m going to combine my reviews and post them in January. 

Now, onto the books!

Koala : a book that makes you feel emotional/ cuddly– the Geek Girl series are my ultimate comfort read, and I got super emotional reading the last book, so them!

Tiger : a book that’s ferocious– Moxie was a ferocious feminist read that made me want to go and start a revolution! It’s phenomenal, and I’m so glad I picked it up as I don’t read a lot of USYA. Fun fact: tigers are my favourite wild animal.

Panda: a book that’s massive– a book I recently read which I thought was preety massive was the Miseducation of Cameron Post, which has around 460 pages and took me ages to get through. This is one of the books I’ll be reviewing come January!

Sparrow: a book that’s light and cheery– this one has to be Vlad the World’s Worst Vampire by Anna Wilson for me. It was such a happy book, and it really got me out of a reading slump. I’m so happy there’s going to be a sequel.

Wolf: a book series you loved– As I love lots of series, I’ve decided to go with the one with my favourite animal, which is Adventure Island by Helen Moss, which features an incredibly clever dog called Drift.

Horse: a standalone book that you loved– my favourite standalone book ever is Boy in the Tower by Polly Ho-Yen, and of this year I’ve loved Running on the Roof of the World by Jess Butterworth and Being Miss Nobody by Tamsin Winter.

What do you think of these books? What are your favourite animals? Let me know in the comments or on Twitter @GoldenBooksGirl !

Amy xxx

Guest Post: Zoe’s Halloween Horror Recommendations

Happy Halloween everyone!

To celebrate the occasion, I asked my lovely friend Zoe, of the equally fabulous No Safer Place, who is a huge horror fan (unlike me, who is a huge wuss) to write some horror recommendations. Enjoy! 

Amy xxx

Over to Zoe 😊


I have loved horror for as long as I can remember. I believe books started this love. My earliest memory of horror is reading Goosebumps and Shivers books when I was around 7/8 and the love only grew from there. Today I thought I’d share my love of horror over the years, starting with my favourite horror book as a child, to my favourite horror book now.

A Ghostly Playmate (Shivers) by M.D. Spenser

So this book was the first horror book I fell in love with. I must have been around 7 when I read it and it terrified me. The idea of moving into a new house, feeling lonely and finding a friendly ghost who wants to be your friend – only to find out she wants you to be her friend forever and she’ll do whatever it takes to get you onto her side…I mean, that’s pretty terrifying. Shivers books are brilliant and if you haven’t read them, pick them up on Amazon!

Night of the Living Dummy (Goosebumps) by R.L Stine

Once I got the taste for horror, I couldn’t stop. Slappy is one of my all time favourite characters. I went to a Goosebumps Alive adult experience recently and I don’t think I’ve ever been as terrified as when I saw Slappy brought to life. Who doesn’t love a good ventriloquist dummy coming to life and trying to kill you? R.L Stine has been one of my favourite authors since I was about 8, and he still is!

Frozen Charlotte by Alex Bell

Horror in YA is seriously lacking and this breaks my heart. As a lover of YA and horror, nothing made me happier when I found Alex Bell. I read Frozen Charlotte as part of the Zoella Book Club and completely fell in love. Creepy dolls that come to life and torture you and force you to do some truly horrific things. What’s not to love? The prequel Charlotte Says is even better – and even more brutal!

The Exorcist by William Peter Blatty

Adult horror. I hadn’t read this until a few months ago. Obviously I’d seen the film, loved the TV series and I really wanted to read the original material. It was so much better than the film (I expected no less) and honestly, some of the detail and description is so graphic, it made me feel physically sick…but isn’t that the best part about horror?

Dracula by Bram Stoker

Does this really need an explanation? Dracula is one of the most stunning books ever written and when I read Dracula, aged 14, it changed horror for me. I had a new found adoration for the genre, particularly for vampires and I still do. There is something about Dracula that is just so bloody (excuse the pun!) beautiful.

What are your favourite horror books? What are you reading this Halloween? Let me know in the comments below!